The Worst “Power Outage”

electricity

This past weekend I think I discovered the most beautiful sentence in the entire English language: “Your electricity is back on!” Well, okay, I admit that “I love you” and “Your tumor is benign” probably rank higher, but I sure was thrilled to hear that the power had been restored to my house after four-and-a-half days without it.

During the outage, it was an odd sensation walking around my house with no heat, no lights and no “whirring” noises coming from kitchen appliances. It was the same house, structurally, as always, but it seemed so cold (literally) & dead. Though the exterior looked the same, the inside had become lifeless – a mere shell of the home I love.

It seems to me that this is an apt metaphor for the spiritual condition of so many Christians in our day. At some point in their life, these believers were undoubtedly full of warm desire to follow Jesus and shine the light of Christ to everyone they encountered. But, then, something along the way happened to them. Though their spiritual condition may outwardly appear the same as always – attending church & “going through the motions” religiously – their faith has actually become a lifeless shell of what it once was. Gone is the “warmth” for following Jesus. The “light” that once witnessed to the goodness of Christ has turned dark. The “whirring” of a mind deeply engaged in Bible study & meditation has become silent. And the “power” of a Christ-centered life has gone out.

The good news is that – like my house – this state of coldness & deadness does not have to be permanent. If you’re in this lifeless spiritual condition (or near to it), it’s time to re-connect (fully & completely) with Jesus, and let the power of his love warm your heart once again.

 

Eron Elswick

Worship – Grow – Serve

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2 responses to “The Worst “Power Outage”

  1. I don’t think you can write anything without using a metaphor. Metaphor overkill.

    • Yeah, I seem to crank out metaphors like Nadya Suleman cranks out babies. (Hey, I used a simile instead of a metaphor! Maybe I’m improving.).
      Thanks for the (hopefully) friendly criticism and thanks for reading.

      Eron

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